Mexican Mint

minting institution icon Mexican flag icon The oldest mint in the Americas - producer of the Libertad coins

The Mexican Mint ("La Casa de Moneda de México") is the official mint of the Republic of Mexico. It is the oldest mint on the American continents and produces the country's circulation and commemorative coins for the Bank of Mexico as well as various medals. The Mexican Mint produced various gold bullion coins throughout its history like the Mexican Centenario, Azteca and Hidalgo gold coins. Nowadays, it is the Mexican Libertad coins out of gold and silver that the mint is known for among bullion investors worldwide. The mint's ancient headquarter in Mexico City is nowadays a museum. All the coin production takes place at state-of-the-art facilities in San Luis Potosí.

silver coins that the Mexican Mint produced for the 1968 Olympic Games
the modern plant of the Mexican Mint in San Luis Potosí
logo of the Mexican Mint

Minting Facilities

The historic headquarter of the Mexican Mint in a colonial-era building in Mexico City has become the National Museum of Cultures ("Museo Nacional de las Culturas") in 1966. The museum can be visited from Tuesday to Sunday (10 am to 5 pm) and admission is free of charge. It is located inside Mexico City's historic center (official address: Moneda No. 13, Centro Histórico, Deleg. Cuauhtémoc, C.P. 06010 México, D.F.) in close proximity to the Zócalo metro station. Many other landmarks of historical significance like the Palacio Nacional, Catedral Metropolitana and Museo de la Secretaría de Hacienda y Crédito Público are located in the same area.

The current production facility of the Mexican Mint is located in San Luis Potosí since 1992. The mint is housed there inside a modern building and uses state-of-the-art equipment. The facility can be visited and a visit starts with the spacious lobby where the mint's products are prominently displayed.

History

The first mint in what is now Mexico (then "New Spain") was founded in 1535 at a site where the Palacio Municipal now stands. In 1569, the mint moved to the Palacio Nacional. Private entrepreneurs rented the minting rights during the 17th and 18th century. These subsidiary mints once existed all over Mexico, normally close to silver mines which were abundant throughout the country.

The Mexican Mint started operations in its first exclusive building in 1734. The practice of renting out minting rights ended in 1778 when royal reforms put the Mexican Mint under the control of the Ministry of Finance. By then, the mint had already been modernized. The colonial-era building that then housed the Mexican Mint is now the National Museum of Cultures ("Museo Nacional de las Culturas").

In 1850, minting operations moved to Apartado Street in Mexico City. Still, Mexico's coin production couldn't keep up with increasing demand in the 19th century, resulting in the outsourcing of a part of the coin production to foreign mints (for example to the United States Mint in Philadelphia). In 1905, Mexico started an initiative to upgrade its minting operations. With the help of new machines and the extensive training of its workers, the Mexican Mint was soon able to produce all the needed coinage without the help of foreign mints a few years later.

Since 1986, the Mexican Mint competes on the market as a private mint and is no longer under control of the finance ministry. The current modern mint facility opened in San Luis Potosí in 1992.

The Mexican Mint's Gold Bullion Coins

obverse side of the 2009 issue of the brilliant uncirculated 1 oz Mexican Gold Libertad coin
reverse side of the 2009 issue of the brilliant uncirculated 1 oz Mexican Gold Libertad coin

Mexican Gold Libertads

The Mexican Gold Libertad coins are struck out of 99.9% pure gold since 1981. Their design that depicts the Angel of Independence is inspired by the historic 50 Peso Gold Centenario coins. The Mexican Gold Libertads are minted by the Casa de Moneda de México, the oldest mint in North America, in the denominations of 1 oz, 1/2 oz, 1/4 oz, 1/10 oz and 1/20 oz. Both brilliant uncirculated and proof coins are available. The coins don't have an official face value and their annual mintage numbers are much lower than those of other gold bullion coins. Despite that, the coins have legal tender status in Mexico.

The Mexican Gold Libertad page gives more information about the coins and allows you to compare current prices.

The Mexican Mint's Historic Gold Coins

obverse side of a 50 Peso Mexican Gold Centenario coin that was minted in 1943
reverse side of a 50 Peso Mexican Gold Centenario coin that was minted in 1943

Mexican Gold Centenarios

The Casa de Moneda de México produced the 50 Peso Mexican Gold Centenarios between 1921 and 1947. The coin was named Centenario because it is dedicated to the 100th anniversary of Mexico gaining its independence from Spain, its former colonial master. The coins are considerably larger and heavier (gold weight of 1.2057 oz) than most historic gold bullion coins and are composed of 90% gold and 10% copper. The Centenarios are the largest of the different gold bullion coins from Mexico. Their obverse side shows Mexico's Angel of Independence with a laurel wreath and broken chains. An eagle perched on top of a prickly pear cactus holding a serpent can be seen on the reverse.

The Mexican Gold Centenario page gives more information about the coins and allows you to compare current prices.

obverse side of a 20 Peso Mexican Gold Azteca coin that was minted in 1920
reverse side of a 20 Peso Mexican Gold Azteca coin that was minted in 1920

Mexican Gold Aztecas

Many investors and collectors consider the intricately designed 20 Peso Mexican Gold Aztecas to be one of the most beautiful gold coins of all time. The Casa de Moneda de México produced these 20 Peso gold coins between 1917 and 1921 and in 1959. The coins are considerably smaller than the 50 Peso Centenario gold coins. Azteca gold coins are composed of 90% gold and 10% copper and have an actual gold weight of 0.4823 oz. A total of 6,174,000 such coins were minted. The obverse side of the coins shows the Aztec Calendar Stone. The rendering of the eagle & snake design on the reverse is different from that on the Centenarios.

The Mexican Gold Azteca page gives more information about the coins and allows you to compare current prices.

obverse side of the 1945 2.5 Peso Mexican Gold Hidalgo coin
reverse side of the 1945 2.5 Peso Mexican Gold Hidalgo coin

Mexican Gold Hidalgos

The Casa de Moneda de México produced the Mexican Gold Hidalgo coins between 1905 and 1959 in the denominations of 10 Peso (0.2411 oz), 5 Peso (0.1205 oz), 2.5 Peso (0.0603 oz) and 2 Peso (0.0482 oz). Not all denominations were minted in every year and there were various mintage interruptions during this period. The coins are composed of 90% gold and 10% copper. The Hidalgo gold coins are named after Don Miguel Hidalgo y Costilla whose portrait appears on the obverse of all except the 2 Peso coins. The reverse of the coins shows an eagle on top of a cactus holding a serpent, just like on the Centenarios.

The Mexican Gold Hidalgo page gives more information about the coins and allows you to compare current prices.

Other Precious Metal Bullion Coins

obverse side of the 2017 issue of the brilliant uncirculated 1 oz Mexican Silver Libertad coin
reverse side of the 2017 issue of the brilliant uncirculated 1 oz Mexican Silver Libertad coin

Mexican Silver Libertads

The Mexican Silver Libertad coins are struck out of 99.9% fine silver since 1982 by the Casa de Moneda de México. The coins bear the same design of the Angel of Independence as the Gold Libertad coins. That design originated with the historic 50 Peso Gold Centenario coins. The Silver Libertads exist in many different sizes ranging from 1/20 oz all the way up to 1 kg. The coins don't have an official face value but are nevertheless legal tender in Mexico. Both brilliant uncirculated and proof coins are available. The 1 kg Mexican Silver Libertads are available with a proof-like finish. Proof coins make up an unusually large share of the total mintage of the coins.

The Mexican Silver Libertad page gives more information about the coins and allows you to compare current prices.

obverse side of the 1989 issue of the proof 1/4 oz Mexican Platinum Libertad coin

Mexican Platinum Libertads

Mexican Platinum Libertad coins were only minted in the year 1989. That year, the Casa de Moneda de México produced 3,500 Platinum Libertads out of 99.9% fine platinum. Mintage was limited to a single denomination of 1/4 oz. These coins were only available with a proof finish. The design of both sides of the coins was identical to the gold and silver version of the Libertad coins that was minted until 1994.

The inscription on the mintmarked obverse side of the coins with the Angel of Independence reads: 1/4 ONZA PLATINO PURO 1989 MEXICO LEY 999.