Mexican Mint


the modern plant of the Mexican Mint in San Luis Potosí
the modern plant of the Mexican Mint in San Luis Potosí.

The Mexican Mint ("La Casa de Moneda de México") is the official mint of the republic of Mexico. It is the oldest mint on the American continents and produces the country's circulation and commemorative coins for the Bank of Mexico as well as various medals. After having produced various gold bullion coins throughout its history, the Gold Libertad coins are arguably the mint's most popular bullion product among investors nowadays.

Minting Facilities

The historic headquarter of the Mexican Mint in a colonial-era building in Mexico City has become the National Museum of Cultures ("Museo Nacional de las Culturas") in 1966.

The current Mexican mint is located in San Luis Potosí since 1992. The mint is housed there inside a modern building and uses state-of-the-art equipment. The facility can be visited and a visit starts with the spacious lobby where the mint's products are prominently displayed.

History

The first mint in what is now Mexico (then "New Spain") was founded in 1535 at a site where the Palacio Municipal now stands. In 1569, the mint moved to the Palacio Nacional. Private entrepreneurs rented the minting rights during the 17th and 18th century. These subsidiary mints once existed all over Mexico, normally close to silver mines which were abundant throughout the country.

Logo of the Mexican Mint
Logo of the Mexican Mint.

The Mexican Mint started operations in its first exclusive building in 1734. The practice of renting out minting rights ended in 1778 when royal reforms put the Mexican Mint under the control of the Ministry of Finance. By then, the mint had already been modernized. The colonial-era building that then housed the Mexican Mint is now the National Museum of Cultures ("Museo Nacional de las Culturas").

In 1850, minting operations moved to Apartado Street in Mexico City. Still, Mexico's coin production couldn't keep up with increasing demand in the 19th century, resulting in the outsourcing of a part of the coin production to foreign mints (for example the US mint in Philadelphia). In 1905, Mexico started an initiative to upgrade its minting operations. With the help of new machines and the extensive training of its workers, the Mexican Mint was soon able to produce all the needed coinage without the help of foreign mints a few years later.

Since 1986, the Mexican Mint competes on the market as a private mint and is no longer under control of the finance ministry. The current modern mint facility opened in San Luis Potosí in 1992.

Popular Gold Bullion Coins

The Mexican Mint produces the popular Gold Libertad coins in denominations of 1/20 oz, 1/10 oz, 1/4 oz, 1/2 oz and 1 oz with an actual gold content of 99.9%.

Popular historic gold coins of the Mexican Mint are the 50 Gold Peso (Centenario), 20 Gold Peso (Azteca) and Hidalgo Gold Peso (in denominations of 10 Peso, 5 Peso, 2.5 and 2 Peso) coins.


Mexican Gold Libertads

low annual mintages
in 1 oz, 1/2 oz, 1/4 oz, 1/10 oz and 1/20 oz
99.9% gold

obverse side of the Mexican Gold Libertad coin (since 2000)
reverse side of the new 1 oz Mexican Gold Libertad coin

Mexican Gold Centenarios

produced from 1921-1947
large coin (37.1 mm diameter)
90% gold, 10% copper

obverse side of the Mexican 50 Peso Gold Centenario coin
reverse side of the Mexican 50 Peso Gold Centenario coin

Mexican Gold Aztecas

produced from 1917-1921
low 3 - 4% premium
90% gold, 10% copper

obverse side of the Mexican 20 Peso Gold Azteca coin
reverse side of the Mexican 20 Peso Gold Azteca coin

Mexican Gold Hidalgos

produced from 1905-1959
available as MXP 10, MXP 5, MXP 2.5, MXP 2
90% gold, 10% copper

obverse side of the Mexican 10 Peso Gold Hidalgo coin
reverse side of the Mexican 10 Peso Gold Hidalgo coin